Sometimes getting ranked on Google feels like rocket science, especially since how Google decides to list your site is based on algorithms that frequently change. This requires you keeping up on current rules and trends. For example, in 2015 Google decided it would give preferential ranking to sites that were mobile-friendly since so many people are now using mobile devices. Even more recently, Google added a notice in the Chrome browser to indicate if a site was secure with SSL or not (FireFox has this feature as well) and includes it as part of it's ranking formula.
Over the years, SEO has become more involved as search engines developed more aspects to how it ranked sites. For example, in the early 2000's, simply having the page's name as part of the URL increased the odds of getting ranked (instead of www.yoursite.com/page1 the site had www.yoursite.com/titleofpage). As the Internet grew, bringing order and reliable results became more difficult. There are many website owners who use blackhat tactics to game the system. The problem with this is that it meant search engines weren't delivering the content web searchers were looking for.
Customer demand for online services may be underestimated if you haven"t researched this. Perhaps, more importantly, you won't understand your online marketplace: the dynamics will be different to traditional channels with different types of customer profile and behaviour, competitors, propositions, and options for marketing communications. There are great tools available from the main digital platforms where we can find out the level of customer demand, we recommend doing a search gap analysis using Google's Keyword planner to see how you are tapping into the intent of searchers to attract them to your site, or see how many people interested in products or services or sector you could reach through Facebook IQ.

To create an effective DMP, a business first needs to review the marketplace and set 'SMART' (Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Relevant and Time-Bound) objectives.[62] They can set SMART objectives by reviewing the current benchmarks and key performance indicators (KPIs) of the company and competitors. It is pertinent that the analytics used for the KPIs be customised to the type, objectives, mission and vision of the company.[63][64]
The digital marketer usually focuses on a different key performance indicator (KPI) for each channel so they can properly measure the company's performance across each one. A digital marketer who's in charge of SEO, for example, measures their website's "organic traffic" -- of that traffic coming from website visitors who found a page of the business's website via a Google search.
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